Reason 346

From JimmyEatWiki
Reason 346
Jimmy Eat World 1994.jpg
Jimmy Eat World (1994) Album Cover
Written: 1993
Released: 1994-01-23
Length: 4:24
Label: Wooden Blue Records
Writer: Jimmy Eat World
Producer: Jimmy Eat World, Steve Naughton

Track 9 of 11 on Jimmy Eat World's self-titled first album. The album displays their early sound with Tom Linton singing lead. The album also marks the only appearance of former bass guitarist Mitch Porter.

Appears On

Lyrics

They're disregarding us telling me I'm blind

Trying to rid my mind

And if worst comes to worst I think I'll be first to never be the same

We're not to blame

I wasn't there

Hair in her eyes and it didn't cost a thing

Fell to my knees

Stuck on like fleas

Saw on TV and it took effect

And who were they to judge?

It could have be way worse, it didn't have to strain

They bound us sleep which didn't mean a thing

Calling in for free

Sick of being down while coming through a fall

I want out

We're not to blame

I wasn't there

Hair in her eyes and it didn't cost a thing

Fell to my knees

Stuck on like fleas

Saw on TV and it took effect

Come on down

Come on down

Now round this (chos?) found an (ink?)

Where not one trace left of you that's clear where found your face

Dreams and my full Circle K

Dreams and my full Circle K

Dreams and my full Circle K

That's where your mom can find you now

Recording Details

Recorded at the Phoenix Recording Company and Mastered at Mind's Eye Digital. [1] This album is the only CD release with bassist Mitch Porter. Jimmy Eat World (album) was produced with Jimmy Eat World and Steve Naughton. The album cover photo features "what looks like a home movie still of Tom Linton’s brother Jim noogeying his younger sibling Ed. Ed would eventually get revenge by drawing a fattened version of Jim eating the world, thus providing the band with its name." [2] this photo is featured on the 1993/'94_Demo_Cassette. Wooden Blue Records pressed the record. Wooden Blue was a Phoenix, AZ independent record label in the late 1980s to early 1990s run by Joel Leibow and Jeremy Yocum [3] Jimmy Eat World was released in 1994-12 [1] in a 2000 copy [4] run with two versions, one with a black disc and one with one silver [5]. Both have the same rocket/stars art on the disc. This has not been re-pressed by the band, one writer who had interviwed the band about this album reflected "the band’s self-titled debut is so un-Jimmy Eat World that they decided never to re-press it. [2]

Reception

The album had limited distribution and didn't chart.

One reviewer said of the album, "It’s gnarled, almost punkish aggression is closest to Static Prevails, but without the contemplation and atmosphere." [2]

An AV Club review for the Damage Album said "The ninth song, 'Reason 346,' hinted at the future. [It] found the band stretching out. True, it starts off as fairly typical pop-punk, but around the 2:30 mark the song pulls back, with just drummer Zach Lind and then-bassist Mitch Porter playing quietly. After a few seconds, Adkins’ voice joins, sounding like he’s about 10 feet away from the mic. One of the guitars returns, with clean single notes. An acoustic playing chords joins after that. Then, almost at the 3:30 mark exactly, everything kicks in for a cathartic instrumental coda. At that moment, it’s easy to see Static Prevails in the distance." [6]

Personnel

Jimmy Eat World

Other personnel

Other Versions

See Also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Jimmy Eat World, Jimmy Eat World, 1994-12, Wooden Blue Records ‎– I.S.Y. 004, 2021-05-26,
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 https://consequence.net/2013/06/dissected-jimmy-eat-world-with-jim-adkins/2/, Dissected: Jimmy Eat World (with Jim Adkins), Caffrey, Dan, 2013-06-13, Consequence of Sound, Consequence of Sound, 2021-05-26,
  3. https://myspace.com/woodenbluerecords, Wooden Blue Records, MySpace, MySpace, 2021-05-26,
  4. https://www.tucsonweekly.com/tucson/all-you-can-eat/Content?oid=1069787, All You Can Eat, Seigel, Stephen, 2002-02-14, Tuscon Weekly, 2021-05-21, it
  5. https://www.discogs.com/master/415635-Jimmy-Eat-World/reviews, soundforlanguage, 2019-04-20, Discogs, Jimmy Eat World - Jimmy Eat World — soundforlanguage April 20, 2019 referencing Jimmy Eat World, CD, Promo, I.S.Y. 004 There are only two pressings in existence, one with a black disc, one silver. Both have the same rocket/stars art. This is definitely a bootleg and should be removed from Discogs. Sorry you got a fake copy. Hopefully you've found an authentic one since then.,
  6. https://music.avclub.com/jimmy-eat-world-would-like-everyone-to-forget-about-re-1798238718, Jimmy Eat World would like everyone to forget about “Reason 346”, Ryan, Kyle, 2013-06-14, AV Club, 2021-02-01, The band that released Jimmy Eat World and the one that released Damage is the same in name only. Well, mostly. The ninth song, “Reason 346,” hinted at the future. While most of Jimmy Eat World is forgettable pop-punk (though I still love the opener, “Chachi”), “Reason 346” found the band stretching out. True, it starts off as fairly typical pop-punk, but around the 2:30 mark the song pulls back, with just drummer Zach Lind and then-bassist Mitch Porter playing quietly. After a few seconds, Adkins’ voice joins, sounding like he’s about 10 feet away from the mic. One of the guitars returns, with clean single notes. An acoustic playing chords joins after that. Then, almost at the 3:30 mark exactly, everything kicks in for a cathartic instrumental coda. At that moment, it’s easy to see Static Prevails in the distance (not that Jimmy Eat World’s especially happy with that album, either). Jimmy Eat World would probably say the band found its footing on Clarity, and no one would argue that. But I still love those old songs, too. When I picked up a Japanese import version of the band’s B-sides and singles compilation back in 2001, I was delighted to see “Reason 346” on it. I like to think Jimmy Eat World secretly appreciates that old song too. (I’m probably wrong.),

External Links

Jimmy Eat Pod Episode Link: https://www.jimmyeatpod.com/003-reason-346/

https://genius.com/Jimmy-eat-world-reason-346-lyrics

New Wave of American Heavy Metal, Garry Sharpe-Young